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Month: August 2010

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Proof Review: The Back Up Plan (2010)

If you can possibly untangle your way through the mish mash of plot and meant-with-the-intent-for-laughs storyline, then enjoy The Back Up Plan without me. My one worded review for the film would be “atrocious”. The longer version: a piece of recycling with a brand new bow tied to it.

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Proof Review: Date Night (2010)

Date Night simply never feels grounded. The film comes off tacky and unoriginal, though still mainstream and made for an older age group. The idea of a married couple getting mixed up in a blackmailing crime for stealing reservations in attempt to escape their old life is completely laughable and unrealistic.

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Proof Review: Harry Brown (2010)

Instead of begging for multiple viewings, Harry Brown begs you to watch one of the films at any other end of the spectrum. Harry Brown is not a black mark on the actors’ or director’s resume by any means, but still opens a desire for wanting more out of the film as a whole.

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Proof Review: Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World (2010)

Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World screams originality and devotion from the creators and all those involved. Hilarity spews from every orifice of the film, causing this viewer to laugh from start to finish on two separate viewings. Dialogue, style, music, and action make Scott Pilgrim an easy mark for remaining relevant for decades to come, giving off an antiquity, yet a modern spin on a basic situation. Plain and simple, Scott Pilgrim is *cuss*ing awesome and worth the price of admission 10x over.

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Proof Review: Survival Of The Dead (2010)

There is a unique experience in viewing a zombie flick directed by the man that revolutionized the genre, much like it probably felt to watch Picasso paint. Romero broke onto the scene 32 years ago and altered the horror brand forever, making the idea of zombies what it is today. Survival of the Dead gives off a radiance that makes you feel at home in the presence of a Romero contrivance, allowing one to confide in the man that set the undead wheel in motion.

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Proof Review: Solitary Man (2010)

Solitary Man, much like the character of Ben, is difficult to invest in at times. Though the actors are selected correctly, the dismissal of the main character lacks the effect that Ben Stiller carried in his repugnant role in Greenberg.

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Proof Review: Bringing Out The Dead (1999)

Martin Scorsese is one of the last great film directors. Bringing Out The Dead produces such an abundance of dramatic interest, the film persists to be anything less than perfection. Pair Scorsese with a brilliantly eccentric man like Nicolas Cage and an entirely new world opens up.

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Proof Review: Me & Orson Welles (2009)

One would assume that a film portraying one of the most influential directors in the history of the cinema would unquestionably be an epic masterpiece. Unfortunately, those expectations fall extremely short. In fact, Me & Orson Welles was little more than a flop.

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Proof Review: The Good, The Bad, The Weird (2010)

The Good, The Bad, The Weird IS the best foreign film of the year (thus far). With superb quality, divine action sequences, and a master crafted cast, the film translates to a perfect cinematic masterpiece, the likes of something Clint Eastwood had probably never imagined.

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Proof Review: The White Ribbon (2009)

The children, by far, out-act the adults in The White Ribbon..
Though the film did not come through on Oscar night, the film still feels award winning and will continue to be one of the best foreign films I have ever seen.

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Proof Review: Leaves Of Grass (2010)

Leaves of Grass proves that Edward Norton is not only a talented mainstream actor, but can carry a lower budget film. Though the ending is questionable, the majority of the film is still worth a viewing, especially for Edward Norton fans, or fans catching all the small roles that Susan Sarandon is frequenting these days. Complete with the stamp of approval from Roger Ebert, Leaves of Grass shows serious potential in the weeks leading up to its DVD release date. Not bad for a film named after a book of poetry by Walt Whitman. Not bad at all.

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Proof Review: Tenderness (2009)

Certain films, it appears, exist solely to tease viewers into craving the superior films in an actors annals, all while being forced to endure the detrimental ventures of said actor. Tenderness is one of those films. Russell Crowe stars as Lt. Cristofuoro, yet the entire film I could not help but reimagine all the better performances Crowe has delivered throughout his career.