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Month: September 2010

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Proof Review: Uncertainty (2009)

Uncertainty never quite comes off big time but still carries the Indy time feel auspiciously. The inclusion of Joseph Gordon-Levitt creates a higher caliber experience and ultimately makes the film worth more than most Indy films that lack star power.

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Proof Review: The Square (2010)

Not everyone can make a cohesive film, so developing a conditioned film is a feat. But there comes a point where films are being made simply for the sake of making films, serving no higher purpose. To me, The Square is such a film.

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Proof Review: Killers (2010)

Killers only works well because Ashton Kutcher and Katherine Heigl are established and bring a sense of credibility with them when playing new roles, where you do not entirely have to be on board with what is happening around them, as long as they are present and active in their roles. Killers is not completely up to par with its predecessors like the compared Mr. & Mrs. Smith, but worth a viewing for the unique teaming of Kutcher and Heigl.

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Proof Review: After Hours (1985)

Martin Scorsese delivers gorgeous scenery, fully capturing the grit of the New York streets, but with a lackluster story and overblown performances stemming from the ridiculousness of the situations, After Hours fails to live up to the rest of Scorsese’s anthology.

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Proof Review: Ondine (2010)

No matter how you approach Ondine, Colin Farrell’s continued talent cannot be argued and Alicja Bachleda’s emergence is fresh and brilliant. In a sea of overpopulated films, Ondine is a vivid and unconventional catch.

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Proof Review: The King Of Comedy (1983)

Scorsese invents and De Niro brandishes such a well conceived character, most will find it difficult to distinguish whether Rupert Pupkin is just a troubled lunatic allowed to walk the streets or whether he is a mild and misguided childlike embodiment. Before there was Punch Drunk Love or Greenberg, Scorsese was cataloging his own brand of dark comedy and truly gives that genre a staple piece. Regardless of previous impressions of Martin Scorsese, you cannot deny his ingenuity and originality.

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Proof Review: Just Married (2003)

Just Married comes through with heart and two great performances, but suffers from a childish feeling that only Scott Levy can master and the dreadful “Ben Stiller Effect”, making it just short of amazing.

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Proof Review: 10 Things I Hate About You (1999)

10 Things I Hate About You is made of memorable moments, ranking it at the top of the chart of all-time best teen drama-edies. No other teen flicks have the acting power, the soundtrack, or the heart that 10 Things I Hate About You delivered over a decade ago. The film feels more like the first period of your senior year at high school rather than a formal film.

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Proof Review: Rescue Dawn (2007)

Rescue Dawn strikingly comes off like Francis Ford Coppola’s paragon, Apocalypse Now, delving the audience into a world they do not completely understand, nor that the characters understand, as they trod along relentless. Even the dark feel of the film sheers through its big budget bravado. Christian Bale proves why he is the big name that he has become today. Rescue Dawn is completely unlike any of Herzog’s recent films.

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Proof Review: All The Real Girls (2003)

All The Real Girls requires investment and a leap of faith, but given the opportunity, the film will satisfy a humor that you never realized existed inside of you.

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Proof Review: Diary Of The Dead (2008)

Had the cast been slightly more credible and the dialogue not so repetitive, Diary Of The Dead could have easily become one of the best zombie films in the genre. Instead, it only accomplishes being original, yet failing to the raise the bar for zombie horror flicks.

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Proof Review: Small Town Saturday Night (2010)

Had the film found more well known actors and actresses and fitted to a new structure, Small Town Saturday Night could have been something special. Instead, Small Town becomes small time and will ultimately be passed over by most viewers, save for the tagline on the case of the film: “Starring Chris Pine from Star Trek.”