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Month: October 2010

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Proof Review: The Marc Pease Experience (2009)

The Marc Pease Experience is a typical underdog story with the atypical Schwartzman at the helm, producing a unique adventure into the life of what appear to be normal people. Without Stiller, Marc Pease would truly feel like the low budget film that it is, but with the star power Marc Pease comes off more like the film Election.

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Proof Review: The Replacements (2000)

The Replacements is not a hilarious movie by far, but it does have its moments and has enough of a well-known cast to keep you entertained. Plus, with Madden commentating the games, the actual football footage comes off authentic and completes the film effectively.

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Proof Review: The Town (2010)

The Town is one of the first films this year that has true Academy Award nominations written all over it. Not only with great performances from Ben Affleck, Jon Hamm, and Jeremy Renner, but with Ben Affleck at the helm as director, the movie screams Best Director nominee. The Town is simple yet completely entertaining, not relying on gimmicks, but instead taking the heist genre to a superior dramatic level.

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Proof Review: The Loss Of A Teardrop Diamond (2009)

Nothing makes me happier than the producing of works from great writers, even after their posthumous. Though Loss Of A Teardrop Diamond does not even begin to compare to classics like A Streetcar Named Desire and Cat On A Hot Tin Roof, the modern display of such an unsung classic really catches the eye and demands at least some respect.

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Proof Review: Machete (2010)

Machete will never be regarded for any sort of performance or logistical nominations, but if Hollywood is looking for ways to entertain audiences without stooping to the “3D propaganda”, Machete is a step in the right direction.

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Proof Review: The Last Temptation Of Christ (1988)

Surrounded by controversy, The Last Temptation of Christ offers an entertaining fictitious spin on the New Testament. Martin Scorsese handles the film masterfully, producing a film worthy of the annals of The Passion of the Christ. Those that are devout Christians will probably steer clear, but for those that are open to another take on the story of Jesus Christ, The Last Temptation is exactly that, but with dimension and heart.

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Proof Review: Mean Streets (1973)

Martin Scorsese delivers his first major feature length film in the gritty and future-making Mean Streets. In his first collaboration with Robert De Niro, Scorsese sets into the motion the wheels of success for everyone involved, including fellow friend and (at the time) aspiring actor Harvey Keitel. With intense imaginary and breakthrough performances from De Niro and Keitel, the film speaks a language that has transcended into all that Scorsese is known for.

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Proof Review: Frozen (2010)

With a small cast and a budget spent mostly on make-up, prosthetics, and the renting of a chairlift, Frozen rises above its low budget contenders and actually provides for a visually pleasing experience despite its questionably low impact concept.