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Month: November 2010

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Proof Review: Cruel Intentions (1999)

Filled with breakthrough performances still representing these actors and actresses to this day and introducing sexual discovery to a generation over a decade ago, Cruel Intentions continues to carry its same weight today without falling into the oldie, but goodie pile, remaining a pop-culture icon. Though the iconic image of the film was Sarah Michelle Gellar and Selma Blair sharing a passionate kiss, the film reaches far further than just shock value and becomes one of the most memorable films from that generation and for that generation.

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Proof Review: Passenger Side (2010)

Basing the entire film around Scott’s trademarked cynicism creates a genuine Indy classic worthy of mainstream status. The fact that Adam Scott has not made more of a stir in the commercial film world is mind boggling, but to have a star like Scott floating around in the Indy world is a refreshing new experience in many Indy films including his huge success in The Vicious Kind.

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Proof Review: The Oxford Murders (2010)

Talk about a film that is too smart for its own good. The Oxford Murders makes the average viewer feel isolated and ostracized. Whatever means the producers took to get leading man Elijah Wood on board, they should consider themselves extremely lucky.

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Proof Review: Taxi Driver (1976)

Robert De Niro warrants respect. Most critics revere the man. That sort of admiration is earned, not by luck, but with hard work and ventures with great directors such as Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Scorsese, both of which tend to draw the best out of De Niro.

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Proof Review: Prince Of Persia: The Sands Of Time (2010)

Prince Of Persia takes all the major plot points from several of its Disney predecessors and combines them into a live action Arabian family feud film, with a hint of the metaphysical and mythological. Though well cast, the film falls short of a film such as 300 and rides the fine line between child’s film and adult action adventure.

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Proof Review: Due Date (2010)

Walking into Due Date, the stage had been set for me to experience a sub-par comedy. No high expectations were allotted for the film with few critics gleaming it an absolute knock-out like The Hangover. However, my actual recollection of the film brings up my argument about hype, and what it does for films and their audiences. Due Date was absolutely hilarious and I enjoyed every minute of it.

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Proof Review: The Experiment (2010)

Adrien Brody and Forest Whittaker are truly enough to make the film interesting, but if you lose their star power, the film would be just another episode of Veronica Mars (minus the beautiful Kristen Bell). If you have not yet experienced any form of this story associated with The Experiment, it would not hurt to catch a viewing of the film, as the plot is somewhat original, save for in the aforementioned media listed above.

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Proof Review: The Secret In Their Eyes (2009)

I am not here to say that the Academy does not know what they are doing in awarding the Oscar to The Secret In Their Eyes. I am simply here to state that out of the two Oscar nominated foreign films that I viewed this year, The White Ribbon appeared superior to The Secret In Their Eyes in a majority of categories. The Secret In Their Eyes does, however, hold key moments that sets it apart from a large chunk of foreign films being released this year and for that, it becomes worth viewing at least once in a lifetime.

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Proof Review: Robin Hood (2010)

The 21st Century version of Robin Hood is not your mom and dad’s Robin Hood. Most know Robin Hood the outlaw, set with his merry men and Maid Marian, stealing from the rich and giving to the poor and portrayed by the likes of Kevin Costner. Ridley Scott’s Robin Hood, however, dares to look at an unseen Robin Hood lore, where Russell Crowe delves into Robin Longside, who is simply looking to fight alongside his fellow man.