THE FAST AND THE FURIOUS: TOKYO DRIFT

BY CHRISTOPHER HASKELL
MAY 19, 2013

Hands down, Sung Kang, as supporting character Han makes this film. There would be nothing redeemable about “The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift” without Kang. For starters, Lucas Black is terrible as the lead character, Sean Boswell, a country hick, sent to Japan after getting into too much trouble. There are no severe consequences for Sean and never are. His “strict” father steps aside to let him do whatever he wants, and a killer Yakuza boss allows him to live for no good reason. Black is not an actor I want to see around, and I did not believe any bit of him in this role.

“Tokyo Drift” succeeds in introducing a new element into street racing, with the fresh idea of drifting, but becomes some odd version of “The Karate Kid” with Han coaching Sean in their ways, for no real reason other than for entertainment. Justin Lin directs this sequel as well as he can but drops the ball with actors that shouldn’t be in high school, and a film that feels like 90% of it is at night. [Spoiler] When the film loses Kang, I lose complete interest and could do without the entire second half of this film. I could also do without Bow Wow, who is the only character I believe as a high school student. The worst installment in the franchise, with no returning characters from the originals (besides a surprise appearance at the end), sets Kang up for much better (I hope) and more well-deserved future endeavors.

RELEASE DATE
June 16, 2006

DIRECTOR
Justin Lin

WRITTEN BY
Chris Morgan

STUDIO
Universal Pictures

PG-13
(for reckless and illegal behavior involving teens, violence, language and sexual content)

ACTION
CRIME
THRILLER

104 minutes

CINEMATOGRAPHER
Stephen F. Windon

COMPOSER
Brian Tyler

EDITOR
Kelly Matsumoto
Dallas Puett
Fred Raskin

CAST
Lucas Black
Bow Wow
Nathalie Kelley
Sung Kang
Brian Tee
Vin Diesel
Nikki Griffin
Amber Stevens West
Zachery Ty Bryan

PRODUCED BY
Neal H. Moritz

BUDGET
$85 million

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