ALL IS LOST

BY CHRISTOPHER HASKELL
NOVEMBER 3, 2013

Starring only Robert Redford, “All Is Lost” wastes no time settling the viewer into the lost at sea adventure that awaits. As Redford tackles a hole in his boat, giant waves from unbearable storms, and the loneliness that comes from being stranded by one’s self, director J.C. Chandor (“Margin Call”) explores the human psyche and the ever-shifting breaking point of one man. Unless he’s screaming, Redford barely says a word, which makes the achievements of this film that much more commendable, as the film then relies on strong visuals and a strong emotional performance from the veteran Redford. One would be remiss to compare this film to last year’s “Life Of Pi,” which also featured being stranded at sea because for one, it was told as a story, a part of Pi’s autobiography, while “All Is Lost”, although uses an “eight days earlier” moniker, is happening in the present. Also, in “Life Of Pi,” the main character has the animals (or humans if that’s how you took it) to give him other challenges.

“All Is Lost” is a survival guide to all the horrible events that can happen out at sea. As stated, Redford’s performance is key, and without any human connection, he is left to project his characteristics through his actions and responses to the oncoming events. The quality I found most endearing was his unwillingness to give up and the constant turning around to pick up his anchor or to go back for just a few more things when his ship is sinking. This is a quality that is not often explored in feature films but is a common and justifiable trait that a sailor would probably have. Suspense is built-in waves, building off moments like the hole in the ship or as it sinks. The viewer is on the edge of their seat, holding their breath for what will present itself next. Had anyone other than Redford try to take on this role, it may not have worked as well, but with Redford at the helm, “All Is Lost” could easily get some Oscar attention.

RELEASE DATE
October 25, 2013

DIRECTOR
J. C. Chandor

WRITTEN BY
J. C. Chandor

STUDIO
Lionsgate
Roadside Attractions

PG-13
(for brief strong language)

ACTION
ADVENTURE
DRAMA

106 minutes

CINEMATOGRAPHER
Frank G. DeMarco

COMPOSER
Alex Ebert

EDITOR
Pete Beaudreau

CAST
Robert Redford

PRODUCED BY
Justin Nappi
Teddy Schwarzman
Neal Dodson
Anna Gerb

BUDGET
$8.5 million

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